Journal cover Journal topic
Hydrology and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
doi:10.5194/hess-2016-502
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
19 Oct 2016
Review status
This discussion paper has been under review for the journal Hydrology and Earth System Sciences (HESS). The manuscript was not accepted for further review after discussion.
Spatio-temporal vegetation dynamics and relationship with climate over East Africa
John Musau1,2, Sopan Patil1, Justin Sheffield3, and Michael Marshall2 1School of Environment, Natural Resources and Geography; Bangor University, UK
2Climate Change Research Unit SD6, World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), Nairobi, Kenya
3Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey
Abstract. Vegetation plays a key role in the global climate system via modification of the water and energy balance. Its coupling to climate is therefore important particularly in the tropics, where severe climate change impacts are expected. Vegetation growth is mutually controlled by temperature and water availability while it modifies regional climate through latent heat flux and changes in albedo. Consequently, understanding how projected climate change will impact vegetation and the forcing of vegetation on climate for various land cover types in East Africa is vital. This study provides an assessment of the vegetation trends in East Africa using Leaf Area Index (LAI) time series for the period 1982 to 2011, lead/lag correlation analysis between LAI and climate, a statistical estimation of vegetation feedback on climate using lagged covariance ratios as well as spatial regression analysis. Our results show few significant changes in current LAI trends though persistent declining vegetation trends are shown from Southern Ethiopia extending through Central Kenya into Central Tanzania. Precipitation (temperature) exerts widespread positive (negative) forcing on lagging vegetation except in forests. Positive correlations between the lagging Antecedent Precipitation Index (API) and LAI were dominant compared to temperature. Positive vegetation feedback on precipitation dominates across the region while a stronger negative forcing is exerted on Tmin compared to Tmax. Spatial dependence was also shown as a key component in the vegetation-climate interactions in the region. Given the vital role of land surface dynamics on local and regional climate, these results provide a valuable point of reference for evaluating the land-atmosphere coupling in the region.

Citation: Musau, J., Patil, S., Sheffield, J., and Marshall, M.: Spatio-temporal vegetation dynamics and relationship with climate over East Africa, Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., doi:10.5194/hess-2016-502, 2016.
John Musau et al.
John Musau et al.

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Short summary
An assessment of vegetation-climate relations over East Africa is presented. LAI trends in Southern Ethiopia through Central Kenya into Central Tanzania show persistent decrease. Precipitation exerts widespread positive forcing on vegetation. North Uganda shows high LAI increase. Positive vegetation feedback on precipitation is dominant while a stronger negative forcing on Tmin is shown. Vegetation-climate interactions show strong spatial dependence. Land cover types influence the interractions.
An assessment of vegetation-climate relations over East Africa is presented. LAI trends in...
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