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Hydrology and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-2016-464
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
06 Sep 2016
Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It has been under review for the journal Hydrology and Earth System Sciences (HESS). The manuscript was not accepted for further review after discussion.
Regionalising rainfall–runoff modelling for predicting daily runoff in continental Australia
Hongxia Li1 and Yongqiang Zhang2 1State Key Laboratory of Hydraulics and Mountain River Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610065, China
2CSIRO Land and Water, PO BOX 1666, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia
Abstract. Numerous regionalisation studies have been conducted to predict the runoff time series in ungauged catchments. However, there are few studies investigating their benefits for predicting runoff time series on a continental scale. This study uses four regionalisation approaches, including spatial proximity (SP), gridded SP, integrated similarity (IS) and gridded IS, to regionalise two rainfall–runoff models (SIMHYD and Xinanjiang) for 605 unregulated catchments distributed across Australia. The SP and IS approaches are used for directly predicting catchment streamflow; the gridded SP and gridded IS approaches are used for predicting runoff at each 0.05° × 0.05° grid cell for continental Australia, which is then aggregated for each catchment. The IS and gridded IS approaches use five properties to build similarity indices, including three physical properties (an aridity index, a fraction of forest ratio and the mean annual air temperature) and two rainfall indices (rainfall seasonality and the standard deviation of daily rainfall). The two rainfall–runoff models show consistent regionalisation results, and there is a marginal difference among the four regionalisation approaches in the wet and densely located catchments. However, the gridded IS approach outperforms the other three in the dry and sparsely located catchments, and it overcomes the unnatural tessellated effect obtained from the gridded SP approach. Use of the gridded IS approach together with rainfall–runoff modelling for predicting runoff on a continental scale is highly recommended. Extra predictors should be included to build similarity indices in other regions, such as the high latitude northern hemisphere or high elevation regions.

Citation: Li, H. and Zhang, Y.: Regionalising rainfall–runoff modelling for predicting daily runoff in continental Australia, Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-2016-464, 2016.
Hongxia Li and Yongqiang Zhang
Hongxia Li and Yongqiang Zhang

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Short summary
Numerous regionalisation studies have been conducted to predict the runoff time series in ungauged catchments. However, there are few studies investigating their benefits for predicting runoff time series on a continental scale. This study uses four regionalisation approaches to regionalise two rainfall–runoff models for continental Australia, demonstrates that the gridded IS approach outperforms other three in data-sparse regions, and is recommendated for large-scale hydrological predictions.
Numerous regionalisation studies have been conducted to predict the runoff time series in...
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