Journal cover Journal topic
Hydrology and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-2017-151
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
05 Apr 2017
Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It has been under review for the journal Hydrology and Earth System Sciences (HESS). The revised manuscript was not accepted.
The effect of water storage change in ET estimation in humid catchments based on Budyko framework and water balance models
Tingting Wang1,2, Fubao Sun1,2,3, Hong Wang1, Wenbin Liu1, and Hao Wang4 1Key Laboratory of Water Cycle and Related Land Surface Processes, Institute of Geographic Science and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
2College of Resources and Environment, University of Chinese, Acad emy of Sciences, Beijing, China
3School of Civil Engineering, Hexi University, Zhangye City, Gansu Province, China
4China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research, State Key Laboratory of Simulation and Regulation of Water Cycle in River Basin, Beijing 100038, China
Abstract. An accurate estimation of evapotranspiration (ET) in humid catchments is essential in water-energy budget research and water resource management. While it remains a huge challenge and there is no well accepted explanation for the difficulty of annual ET estimation in humid region so far. Here we present the ET estimation in 102 humid catchments over China based on the Budyko framework and two hydrological models: abcd model and Xin'anjiang model, in comparison with ET calculated from the water balance equation (ETwb) on the ground that the ΔS is approximately zero at multiannual and annual time scale. And we provide one possible explanation for the poorly annual ET estimation in humid catchments as well. The results show that the Budyko framework works fine in ET estimation in humid catchments at multi-annual timescale, while neither the Budyko framework nor the hydrological models can estimate ET well at annual timescale. One major cause for this poorly annual ET estimation is the neglecting of ΔS in ETwb since it enlarges the variability of real actual ET. Much improvement has been made when comparing estimated ET + ΔS with those ETwb, and the bigger the catchment area is, the better this improvement can be. This provides an acceptable explanation for the poorly estimated annual ET and reveals the important role of annual ΔS in ET estimation and validation in humid catchments. We highlight that the annual ΔS shouldn’t be taken as zero in water balance equation in humid catchments.

Citation: Wang, T., Sun, F., Wang, H., Liu, W., and Wang, H.: The effect of water storage change in ET estimation in humid catchments based on Budyko framework and water balance models, Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-2017-151, 2017.
Tingting Wang et al.
Tingting Wang et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 850 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)

HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
700 129 21 850 89 11 36

Views and downloads (calculated since 05 Apr 2017)

Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 05 Apr 2017)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 850 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)

Thereof 825 with geography defined and 25 with unknown origin.

Country # Views %
  • 1

Saved

Discussed

Latest update: 17 Nov 2017
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Accurate estimation of annual evapotranspiration (ET) in humid catchments remains a huge challenge and there is no well accepted explanation so far. We compare the estimated ET and ET + ΔS against ETwb with assumption that annual ΔS is zero, and find that much improvement has been made in ET + S. This provides an acceptable explanation for the poorly annual ET estimation and highlight that the annual ΔS shouldn't be taken as zero in water balance equation in humid catchments.
Accurate estimation of annual evapotranspiration (ET) in humid catchments remains a huge...
Share