Journal cover Journal topic
Hydrology and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-2017-432
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Opinion article
26 Jul 2017
Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Hydrology and Earth System Sciences (HESS).
Norms and values in socio-hydrological models
Mahendran Roobavannan1, Tim H. M. van Emmerik2, Yasmina Elshafei3, Jaya Kandasamy1, Matthew Sanderson4, Saravanamuthu Vigneswaran1, Saket Pande2, and Murugesu Sivapalan5,6 1School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia
2Department of Water Management, Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands
3School of Earth & Environment, The University of Western Australia, Crawley WA 6009, Australia
4Department of Sociology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA
5Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana IL 61801, USA
6Department of Geography and Geographic Information Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign IL 61820, USA
Abstract. Sustainable water resources management relies on understanding how societies and water systems co-evolve. Many place-based socio-hydrology (SH) studies use proxies, such as environmental degradation, to capture key elements of the social component of system dynamics. Parameters of assumed relationships between environmental degradation and the human response to it are usually obtained through calibration. Since these relationships are not yet underpinned by social science theories, confidence in the predictive power of such place-based socio-hydrologic models remains low. The generalisability of SH models therefore requires major advances in incorporating more realistic relationships, underpinned by appropriate hydrological and social science data, and theories. The latter is a critical input, since human culture – especially values and norms arising from it – influences behaviour and the consequences of behaviours. This paper reviews a key social science theory that links cultural factors to environmental decision-making, assesses how to better incorporate social science insights to enhance SH models, and raises important questions to be addressed in moving forward. This is done in the context of recent progress in socio-hydrological studies and the gaps that remain to be filled. The paper concludes with a discussion of challenges and opportunities in terms of generalisation of SH models and the use of available data to allow future prediction and model transfer to ungauged basins.

Citation: Roobavannan, M., van Emmerik, T. H. M., Elshafei, Y., Kandasamy, J., Sanderson, M., Vigneswaran, S., Pande, S., and Sivapalan, M.: Norms and values in socio-hydrological models, Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-2017-432, in review, 2017.
Mahendran Roobavannan et al.
Mahendran Roobavannan et al.
Mahendran Roobavannan et al.

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Short summary
This paper reviews a relevant social science that links cultural factors to environmental decision-making and assesses how to better incorporate its insights to enhance socio-hydrological (SH) models and the knowledge gaps that remain to be filled. The paper concludes with a discussion of challenges and opportunities in terms of generalisation of SH models and the use of available data to facilitate future prediction and allow model transfer to ungauged basins.
This paper reviews a relevant social science that links cultural factors to environmental...
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