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Hydrology and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-2017-613
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Technical note
24 Oct 2017
Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Hydrology and Earth System Sciences (HESS).
Technical note: Long-term memory loss of urban streams as a metric for catchment classification
Dusan Jovanovic1, Tijana Jovanovic2, Alfonso Mejía2, Jon Hathaway3, and Edoardo Daly1 1Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne, 3800, VIC, Australia
2Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, 16802, PA, USA
3Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, 37996, TN, USA
Abstract. Urbanisation has been associated with a reduction in the long-term correlation within a streamflow series, quantified by the Hurst exponent (H). This presents an opportunity to use the H exponent as an index for the classification of catchments on a scale from natural to urbanised conditions. However, before using the H exponent as a general index, the relationship between this exponent and level of urbanisation needs to be further examined and verified on catchments with different levels of imperviousness and from different climatic regions. In this study, the H exponent is estimated for 38 (deseasonalized) mean daily runoff time series, 22 from the USA and 16 from Australia, using the traditional rescaled-range statistic (R/S) and the more advanced multi-fractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA). Relationships between H and catchment imperviousness, catchment size, annual rainfall and specific mean discharge were investigated. No clear relationship with catchment area was found, and a weak negative relationship with annual rainfall and specific mean streamflow was found only when the R/S method was used. Conversely, both methods showed decreasing values of H as catchment imperviousness increased. The H exponent decreased from around 1.0 for catchments in natural conditions to around 0.6 for highly urbanised catchments. Three significantly different ranges of H exponents were identified, allowing catchments to be parsed into groups with imperviousness lower than 5 % (natural), catchments with imperviousness between 5 and 15 % (peri-urban), and catchments with imperviousness larger than 15 % (urban). The H exponent thus represents a useful metric to quantitatively assess the impact of catchment imperviousness on streamflow regime.

Citation: Jovanovic, D., Jovanovic, T., Mejía, A., Hathaway, J., and Daly, E.: Technical note: Long-term memory loss of urban streams as a metric for catchment classification, Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-2017-613, in review, 2017.
Dusan Jovanovic et al.
Dusan Jovanovic et al.
Dusan Jovanovic et al.

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Short summary
A relationship between Hurst (H) exponent (a long-term correlation coefficient) within a flow time series and various catchment characteristics for a number of catchments in the USA and Australia was investigated. A negative relationship with imperviousness was identified which allowed for an efficient catchment classification, thus making H exponent a useful metric to quantitatively assess the impact of catchment imperviousness on streamflow regime.
A relationship between Hurst (H) exponent (a long-term correlation coefficient) within a flow...
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