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Hydrology and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-2019-48
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-2019-48
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 07 Feb 2019

Research article | 07 Feb 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Hydrology and Earth System Sciences (HESS).

Precipitation Transition Regions over the Southern Canadian Cordillera during January–April 2010 and under a Pseudo-Global Warming Assumption

Juris D. Almonte1,a and Ronald E. Stewart1 Juris D. Almonte and Ronald E. Stewart
  • 1Department of Environment and Geography, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, R3T 2N2
  • anow at: Environmental Science and Engineering Program, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, British Columbia, Canada, V2N 4Z9

Abstract. The occurrence of various types of winter precipitation is an important issue over the southern Canadian Cordillera. This issue is examined from January to April of 2010 by exploiting the high-resolution Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model Version 3.4.1 dataset that was used to simulate both a historical reanalysis (CTRL) and a Pseudo-Global Warming (PGW) experiment (Liu et al., 2016). Transition regions, consisting of both liquid and solid precipitation or liquid precipitation below 0 °C, occurred on 93 % and 94 % of the days in the present and PGW future, respectively. This led to accumulated precipitation within the transition region increasing by 27 % and was associated with a rise in its average elevation by 374 m over the Coast and Insular Mountains and by 240 m over the Rocky Mountains and consequently to an eastward shift towards the higher terrain of the Rocky Mountains. Transition regions comprised of only rain and snow were most common under both the CTRL and PGW simulations although all seven transition region categories occurred. Transition region changes would enhance some of the factors leading to avalanches and would also impact ski resort operations.

Juris D. Almonte and Ronald E. Stewart
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Status: final response (author comments only)
Status: final response (author comments only)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Juris D. Almonte and Ronald E. Stewart
Data sets

High Resolution WRF Simulations of the Current and Future Climate of North America R. Rasmussen and L. Changhai https://doi.org/10.5065/D6V40SXP

Juris D. Almonte and Ronald E. Stewart
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